why-are-you-weeping

After Mary Magdalene saw the empty tomb and concluded that Jesus’ body was stolen, an angel appeared to her asking, “Woman, why are you weeping?” Moments later, while investigating in the garden, Jesus (though a supposed gardener) asked her, “Woman, why are you weeping?” Mary was liberated from demons the first time she encountered Jesus. This time, weeping at His death, she was liberated from sin. Let this wallpaper remind you that those in Christ will be raised again with Him and are liberated from sin. There is no reason to weep.

why-are-you-weeping

On the dawn of Sunday, severe mourning swept through the land of Judea. In the hearts of some, life was fearfully different. Three days earlier, the Son of God had been brutally murdered on a cross—the symbol of a violent death.

Still lamenting His death, Mary Magdalene, Mary (the mother of James), Salome, and Joanna left their homes to visit the tomb where Jesus’ body was buried. They desired to anoint the body to offset the stench of decay.

The sun had yet to rise. They wondered to themselves, “Who will roll away the stone for us to enter the tomb when we arrive?” Suddenly, the thunderous sound of a mighty earthquake shook the land. An angel descended from heaven and rolled the stone back so that the entrance to the tomb was open.

Jesus was already gone.

In this spoken word, Odd Thomas explains the gospel in light of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. He fully paid the price for sinners by perfectly sacrificing Himself as their atonement and rose again to affirm is perfect deity three days later. Greg Gilbert says: “The perfect life Jesus lived is imputed to us, and we are declared righteous. God looks at us, and instead of seeing our sin, he sees Jesus’ righteousness.”

Here is a spoken word by Odd Thomas on Good Friday. He compares our trivial notions of suffering (like missing our morning cup of coffee from Star Bucks) to the agony of the cross that Jesus bore.

putting-the-resurrection-story-together

Since the four gospels tell the same story from four different viewpoints, they can be consolidated and arranged in order to see a clearer picture. The following is an attempt to put the resurrection story together in 20 events—beginning with Resurrection Sunday and ending with the Lord’s ascension to heaven. Each event contains a brief explanation and a list of citations from Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, and Acts.

your-faith-is-futile

Everything about the Christian life hinges on the fact that Jesus Christ was raised from the dead. His resurrection insures our regeneration, justification, sanctification, vocation, resurrection, and glorification. Without the resurrection, none of these blessings is possible. This wallpaper reminds us why the resurrection of Jesus Christ is significant to us.

Upon a life I did not live, upon a death I did not die, I risk my whole eternity on the resurrection.

—Charles Spurgeon

Posted on April 15, 2014 at 7:00 am
why-the-resurrection-is-significant

Ad hominem, Latin for to the person, is the phrase used to describe an argument for truths based on fictitious evidence. In a formal sense, it is logic based on the authority of one who doesn’t exist.

Paul said to the Corinthians, “If Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain” (1 Cor. 15:14). In other words, if Jesus didn’t rise from the grave, all of Christianity is ad hominem.

The resurrection of Christ matters more than you might think. Here are six reasons why the resurrection is significant to you as a Christian.

keep-the-gospel-most-important

In his farewell message, Paul rested safely in Christ knowing he had fought the good fight of faith (2 Tim. 4:7). He had waged the good fight all of his Christian life. And from the inspired words of Scripture, God calls each of us to fight the good fight of faith by putting the gospel first and making it most important.

When the ship is in the ocean, everything is fine. When the ocean is in the ship, you are in trouble.

Unknown Author

Posted on April 8, 2014 at 7:00 am